• Should You Consider Bunion Surgery?

    Bunions, which affect women more often than men, might not be dangerous to your overall health, but they are certainly painful. They occur as the result of an enlargement in the joint at the base of the big toe. Because that joint bears a large portion of your weight when you step, a bunion can cause pain with every step. If you’re dealing with a bunion in Sugar Land , should you consider surgery?

    Watch this video for some insights about bunion surgery. If your symptoms aren’t relieved by conservative treatments, your foot specialist may recommend surgery. If you develop a bunion, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Conservative treatments are most effective when they are started early.

  • Understanding the Risks of Peripheral Neuropathy

    After being diagnosed with diabetes, a podiatrist in Sugar Land will become an important member of your care team. Foot doctors are experts in treating patients with diabetes-related foot problems, including peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage that affects the limbs, hands, or feet. Most often, the symptoms are felt in the toes, feet, and lower legs. Diabetes patients are at a higher risk of peripheral neuropathy because uncontrolled blood glucose levels can damage the sensitive nerves.

    As a result of the nerve damage, patients may suffer from foot pain, numbness, weakness, and tingling. The pain of peripheral neuropathy is often described as a pins and needles sensation, or a sharp, burning pain. When working with patients with diabetes, the podiatrist will routinely check nerve function in the feet, look for wounds, and provide foot care counseling. With the proper podiatric care, patients with diabetes can greatly reduce their risk of neuropathy-related complications, including infected foot wounds, systemic infections, and amputation.

     Peripheral - Neuropathy

  • Common Questions About Revision Bunion Surgeries

    Bunions can be quite frustrating for patients, especially when they’ve already had bunion surgery once. It isn’t uncommon for initial bunion surgeries to fail, leading to the need for revision surgeries. If your bunion recurs, your foot pain persists, or your toe is uncomfortably stiff, it may be time to talk to a podiatrist in Sugar Land about having a second bunion surgery . bunion - surgery

    Should I consider having a revision bunion surgery?

    You and your foot specialist will discuss this issue at length. Revision surgery isn’t right for every patient with bunion surgery failure, but it may be right for you if you experience post-surgical arthritis, bone necrosis, compromised foot function, or severe stiffness. Overcorrection and under-correction are also possible reasons for considering a bunion revision. When you’re making your decision, consider the extent to which your symptoms interfere with your daily activities or affect your quality of life. Consider your level of commitment to strictly following your post-surgical discharge instructions. The recovery and rehabilitation processes are crucial for a successful outcome. Your doctor will also consider your overall health when determining if you’re a good candidate for surgery, including whether you have compromised nerve function or blood flow.

    Are there any additional risks?

    Yes. Revision bunion surgery is far more challenging than the original surgery. It’s essential to work with a podiatrist who has extensive experience performing revision surgeries, as these surgeries often require fixing the technical mistakes made by the original surgeon. The risks associated with any surgery include adverse reactions to the anesthesia, blood clots, bleeding, infections, and damage to nearby blood vessels and nerves. The risks specifically associated with this surgery include the failure of the bone to heal, problems with blood circulation, nerve damage, and prolonged foot swelling.

    What is the recovery process like?

    To obtain a successful outcome for your revision surgery, it’s essential not to rush your recovery. It’s possible that a full recovery will take four to six months. You’ll be asked to keep weight off the affected foot for quite some time, perhaps for six to eight weeks. It’s important to plan your recovery carefully by making any necessary home modifications, arranging for help around the house, and taking enough time off work.

  • First Aid Tips for Foot and Ankle Injuries

    Foot and ankle injuries can range from mildly uncomfortable to painfully debilitating. If you have a serious foot or ankle injury, it’s advisable to see a podiatrist in Sugar Land right away. Podiatrists can diagnose and treat all types of foot injuries , including sprains, strains, lacerations, and fractures. In the meantime, you can use some simple first aid strategies to address your injury. foot - injury

    Following the RICE Method

    Podiatrists strongly recommend the RICE method for treating many foot and ankle injuries, including sprains. This method involves rest, ice, compression, and elevation. When pain develops in the foot or ankle, it’s important not to make the injury worse by continuing to place weight on the foot. Instead, sit or lie down and keep your foot elevated. You can wrap an Ace bandage gently around the foot and ankle, but be careful not to wrap it too snugly. Apply an ice pack for 20 minutes at a time every hour. You can use frozen peas or ice sealed in a plastic bag. Be sure to wrap the ice pack in a towel to prevent tissue damage.

    Treating Bleeding Wounds

    If you sustain a laceration to the foot or ankle, stopping the bleeding is a priority. Press a clean cloth against the wound for a few minutes. Then, clean the wound well with soap and water. Apply sterile gauze or a bandage to the wound, and go to your podiatrist’s office right away.

    Removing Foreign Objects

    Walking around barefoot or in flimsy shoes raises the risk of foreign object penetration in the foot. You might step on a nail or a shard of glass, for instance. If you discover a very small foreign object embedded in your foot, such as a splinter or sliver, you can usually remove it yourself with tweezers. Be sure to sterilize the injury and place a bandage on it. If you have diabetes, you’ll need to see your foot doctor. You should also seek medical help if the object has penetrated deep into the foot or ankle. Your podiatrist will need to remove the object, as you could risk further damage if you try to do the job yourself.