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Answering Questions about Surgery for Flatfoot

podiatrist checking patients flatfoot

There are a variety of foot conditions which a podiatrist can treat, including flatfoot. If you are suffering from foot pain on a regular basis, particularly pain around your heel or arch, you may have flatfeet. Talk to your foot surgeon in Sugar Land about your symptoms, and read the answers to the following questions to find out more about flatfoot and how surgery can help. Surgery for Flatfoot by Advanced Foot and Ankle Specialists

What Is Flatfoot?

Feet that have low arches are considered flat. If you have flatfeet, you may notice that the entire sole of each foot touches the floor when you are standing. While some individuals with flatfeet experience no symptoms, others experience pain that can make activities such as running and playing sports more difficult. Flatfeet may be a hereditary condition that results in the arches not fully developing during childhood, or it can develop as the result of an injury or wear and tear with age. Even if you do not experience foot pain due to flatfeet, you may develop problems with your ankles and knees due to the misalignment of your legs.

What Does Surgery Involve?

If your podiatrist has recommended surgery to correct your flatfeet, you may be wondering what this procedure entails. Flatfoot surgery is a reconstructive procedure that aims to improve the alignment of the foot by creating a higher arch. The exact techniques used depend on the patient’s specific problems, but the procedure usually involves repairing the ligaments and tendons that support the arch. Bone cuts may also be needed to correct flatfeet.

Can Surgery Help Me?

Only a foot surgeon can give you a definitive answer about whether or not flatfoot surgery will help you. However, there are a few signs which indicate that this procedure may be useful. If you experience foot or ankle pain on a daily basis, then you may benefit from surgery. Your podiatrist may recommend non-invasive treatments, such as immobilization, shoe inserts, and physical therapy, before considering foot surgery.

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